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Jill Andre says, “I’m a voyeur, I watch everything", and as a skilled artist, she’s able to quickly capture in her drawings the people she observes, creating a relationship of sorts. From her thousands of sketches, Jill then selects an image and begins to cultivate a deeper relationship by way of her brush and palette. Jill mixes colors till what she sees represents how she feels, and then she marks the canvas. Each brushstroke or shape made is in response to her last. During the painting process, her figures can become obscured and less important, as Andre courageously exposes her vulnerabilities.

Growing up in the Bay Area, Jill knew once college-bound she would pursue a Fine Arts degree in sunny southern California.  She enrolled and excelled in the very competitive design program at Cal State Long Beach. Jill spent 12-weeks in southern France at the Leo Marchutz School, where she absorbed the techniques mastered by four generations of artists, sharpening her own skills and visual perceptions of the world around her.

As a young professional, Jill worked first in the automotive industry, designing after-market products and then as a designer for children’s educational software.  As a result of the dot com crash and economic downturn, Jill was laid off. Once the shock wore off, she saw it as an opportunity to pursue her own drawing and painting and tossed away her portfolio of commercial art. Jill joined the Drawing Circus, satisfying her drive and passion to create.

Jill began showing her work in group exhibits at the encouragement of the Drawing Circus’ founder, Edward Stanton.  Juried exhibitions and solo exhibits soon followed. During a solo exhibit in Palo Alto, a visiting curator from China invited Jill to bring her artwork to the Chaoyang Cultural Museum in Beijing.  As a result of the October 2005 invitational exhibit, Cha Cha Cha now resides permanently in their collection.

From 2009-20012 Jill was an active board member of the Silicon Valley’s chapter of National Women’s Caucus for the Arts, as well as Creative Director for the ‘Honoring Women’s Rights’ exhibit in 2012.  Jill now gives her time regularly to the Midpen Media Center in Palo Alto working on their television production crew and is a creative collaborator on special projects.  

Jill has taught and continues to teach art in both private and group settings.  Her approach is to keep it simple and design an environment where each student can successfully create.

In Crimson,  a   2003   solo exhibit at Art 21 Gallery, Palo Alto, CA.

In Crimson, a 2003 solo exhibit at Art 21 Gallery, Palo Alto, CA.

Sacre Rouge , a self-portrait of stunning strength. Acrylic on canvas; 4.5 feet wide x 14 feet tall. Exhibited in 2012 ‘Honoring Women’s Rights’ at the  National Steinbeck Center , Salinas, CA.

Sacre Rouge, a self-portrait of stunning strength. Acrylic on canvas; 4.5 feet wide x 14 feet tall. Exhibited in 2012 ‘Honoring Women’s Rights’ at the National Steinbeck Center, Salinas, CA.